Accreditation Agencies

Accreditation Workshops – To be held periodically in either a hotel (i.e., New Delhi Marriott Airport Hotel) conference room, or in a local school / career college auditorium.

The accreditation process requires interaction among all segments of the institution in order to prepare the documentation required by the accreditation agency. Ultimately, accreditation documentation and data must support the institutional mission; should confirm that student learning and development takes place; and demonstrate compliance with accreditation and regulatory agencies. Typical preparatory activities for an accreditation visit are shown below.

ACCSC was founded in 1965 as the Accrediting Commission of the National Association of Trade and Technical Schools (NATTS). In 1967, the Commission received recognition from the U.S. Department of Education as a non-profit, independent accrediting agency which confirmed the Commission’s status as a reliable authority for the establishment of educational standards. In 1990, the name changed to the Accrediting Commission of Trade and Technical Schools (ACTTS) a part of the Career College Association and in 1993, the Accreditation Commission separated from the trade association unit creating a new wholly independent organization – the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges of Technology (ACCSCT). In October 2009, ACCSCT changed its name again to the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC).  In 2014, ACCSC earned recognition from the International Network for Quality Assurance Agencies in Higher Education (INQAAHE).
RECOGNITION BY THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
At its June 2011 meeting, the National Advisory Committee for Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI), which is charged with advising the U.S. Secretary of Education on accreditation matters, voted to recommend that ACCSC’s recognition as a reliable authority on quality education be continued for five years, the maximum timeframe allowed under the federal guidelines. ACCSC was one of only two accrediting agencies on NACIQI’s June 2011 agenda to earn the committee’s recommendation for a full five-year term with no additional reporting required.

ACCSC’s scope of recognition with the U.S. Department of Education includes the accreditation of postsecondary, non-degree-granting institutions and degree-granting institutions, including those granting associate, baccalaureate and master’s degrees, that are predominantly organized to educate students for occupational, trade and technical careers, and including institutions that offer programs via distance education.

ACCSC

ACCSC was founded in 1965 as the Accrediting Commission of the National Association of Trade and Technical Schools (NATTS). In 1967, the Commission received recognition from the U.S. Department of Education as a non-profit, independent accrediting agency which confirmed the Commission’s status as a reliable authority for the establishment of educational standards. In 1990, the name changed to the Accrediting Commission of Trade and Technical Schools (ACTTS) a part of the Career College Association and in 1993, the Accreditation Commission separated from the trade association unit creating a new wholly independent organization – the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges of Technology (ACCSCT). In October 2009, ACCSCT changed its name again to the Accrediting Commission of Career Schools and Colleges (ACCSC).  In 2014, ACCSC earned recognition from the International Network for Quality Assurance Agencies in Higher Education (INQAAHE).

RECOGNITION BY THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

At its June 2011 meeting, the National Advisory Committee for Institutional Quality and Integrity (NACIQI), which is charged with advising the U.S. Secretary of Education on accreditation matters, voted to recommend that ACCSC’s recognition as a reliable authority on quality education be continued for five years, the maximum timeframe allowed under the federal guidelines. ACCSC was one of only two accrediting agencies on NACIQI’s June 2011 agenda to earn the committee’s recommendation for a full five-year term with no additional reporting required.

ACCSC’s scope of recognition with the U.S. Department of Education includes the accreditation of postsecondary, non-degree-granting institutions and degree-granting institutions, including those granting associate, baccalaureate and master’s degrees, that are predominantly organized to educate students for occupational, trade and technical careers, and including institutions that offer programs via distance education.

ACICS

Accreditation Process

Determination of Eligibility

To be eligible for consideration for accreditation, an institution or entity must satisfy the following minimum requirements. 

Initial Application

ACICS is committed to collaborating with the institution in effecting a smooth and deliberate path toward meeting criteria and attaining an accreditation status. 

Initial Campus Accountability Report (CAR) 

As part of the complete application for an initial grant of accreditation with ACICS, an institution must complete an Campus Accountability (CAR). The CAR includes important data such as the overall enrollment at the institution, retention of students, and placement of completers and graduates.

Initial Resource Visit 

Following the acceptance of the initial application materials, including the assessment of the institution’s financial stability, an ACICS staff member will conduct an Initial Resource Visit.

Application and Self-Study

The self-study is the most important part of the process of accreditation and must be considered a major effort of the institution. It is not an endeavor that can be completed hastily. It requires time and careful planning. The self-study provides the institution with the opportunity to engage in a comprehensive analysis of all aspects of its operation. Essentially, the self-evaluation process forms the basis for the improvement of the educational effectiveness of the institution.

Accreditation Training

The Renewal Accreditation Workshop provides an overview of the ACICS accreditation process as well as evaluation visit preparation and procedures. The Renewal Accreditation Workshop is required for all institutions applying for a renewal of accreditation. The chief on-site administrator and / or self-study coordinator must attend an accreditation workshop within 18 months prior to the submission of the self-study. The Initial Accreditation Workshop is required for all initial applicants but is also open to anyone interested in learning about the ACICS Initial Accreditation process.

Evaluation Site Visit

When an institution has submitted a satisfactory self-study and other required documentation, the office of the President will appoint a team to visit and evaluate the institution. The institution is notified of the composition of the visiting team and may request that team members be replaced for cause.

Team Report and Response

The team prepares a written report that covers each area reviewed at the institution and includes other information pertinent to an accurate evaluation. The report subsequently is sent by the team chair to ACICS.

Intermediate Review Committee

All materials pertinent to an institution’s accreditation are reviewed by experienced persons before being reviewed by the appropriate commission of ACICS. This group will make a recommendation to ACICS if the evaluation file is complete. If the file is not complete, the reviewers will organize facts for ACICS but will not make a specific recommendation.

Council Decision

Action by ACICS to accredit or renew accreditation or not to do so, or to limit or otherwise condition the grant of accreditation, is determined only following review of pertinent information and data on the institution.

DEAC (*formerly DEAC)

Accreditation is the review of the quality of education offered by an institution or program. In the United States, accreditation is the primary way that students, families, the public, and government officials know that an institution provides a quality education. Accreditors, such as the DEAC, are private, non-governmental organizations created for the purpose of establishing standards of accreditation and reviewing institutions and programs against these standards. Each accrediting organization has bylaws or a constitution that describes the legal framework for its activities and operations.

The accreditation process entails

  • the preparation of a self-evaluation report – a detailed examination of how the institution meets accreditation standards and policies
  • a team visit and report prepared by a team of education administrators, faculty, and practitioners with specialized expertise who determine whether or not accreditation standards are being met
  • a final review and accreditation decision made by the accreditor’s decision-making council or commission. The Commission members typically include education administrators, faculty, members of the public and other experts in the education field.

Accreditation Standards – requirements accreditors establish in areas that include academic quality, curriculum requirements, faculty, student services, ethical business practice, academic support services, learning and research resources, administrative capacity and financial capacity. These standards are developed by the accreditor in consultation with the institutions, faculty, students, administrators and members of the public.

Accreditation Policies – set forth descriptions of the functions and activities of the accrediting organization. Policies typically describe the process of accreditation, substantive changes, due process, appeals, information sharing and conflict of interest. Policies are also developed in consultation with institutions and the public.

More information on the DEAC accreditation process is located in the DEAC Accreditation Handbook.

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Distance Learning

 

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